Post 16 Courses

Qualifications

Exam board: Edexcel
Btec Level 3

Entry Requirements

GCSE Grade 6 in Sciences

Skills required

Designed for learners who are interested in learning about the sector alongside other fields of study, with a view to progressing to a wide range of higher education courses, not necessarily in applied science. To be taken as part of a programme of study that includes other appropriate BTEC Nationals or A Levels. 360 GLH Equivalent in size to one A Level. 4 units of which 3 are mandatory and 2 are external. Mandatory content (83%). External assessment (58%).
Course outline
Young people taking their first step into a new career need the right blend of technical and academic skills to support them. And we know that employers and Higher Education are looking for highly skilled, job-ready individuals with a strong work ethic. That’s why we offer the new BTEC Nationals in collaboration with over 5,000 universities, employers and professional bodies with employability at the heart, so you, the learners can develop the skills and confidence you will need to step into a prosperous future.

Student testimony

Career paths

Completion of the course will enable you to pursue a career as a science technician in a laboratory or progress to a higher education qualification such as an HNC, HND or university degree and go on to a career in nursing, radiography, pharmacy, chemical engineering, biochemistry, veterinary science or forensics.

Course outline/assessment

Unit TitleCourse Content
 

Unit 1

 

 

Principles and Applications of Science I

 

This unit will be assessed through a written exam worth 90 marks, which is set and marked by

Pearson. The exam will last two hours.

The paper is split into three sections, each worth 30 marks:

• Section A – Biology

• Section B – Chemistry

• Section C – Physics.

The topic areas covered in this unit include: animal and plant cells; tissues; atomic structure and

bonding; chemical and physical properties of substances related to their uses; waves and their

application in communications.

 

Unit 2

 

Practical

Scientific

Procedures and

Techniques

This unit introduces you to standard laboratory equipment and techniques, including titration, colorimetry, calorimetry, chromatography, calibration procedures and laboratory safety. Through the practical tasks in the unit, you will develop proficiency in the quantitative analytical techniques of titration and colorimetry, including learning to calculate the concentration of solutions. Internal assessment through four assignments
 

Unit 3

Science

Investigation Skills

Learners will cover the stages involved and the skills needed in planning a scientific investigation: how to record, interpret, draw scientific conclusions and evaluate. This unit will be assessed through a written task (Part B) worth 60 marks. The task is set and marked by Pearson and will be completed in one sitting, within a supervised assessment session timetabled by Pearson. In order to complete the written task in Part B, learners will need to obtain results/observations from the practical investigation in Part A. Pearson will release teacher/technician notes and guidance to centres to enable sufficient time for resources and trialling of the practical investigation.
 

Unit 12

Diseases and InfectionInternal assessment through four assignments. Learners will gain understanding of five types of diseases, their causes and how humans try to prevent and treat them.

Why Study Applied Science:

https://youtu.be/FFo8DmuI9MA

Qualifications

Exam board: EdExcel
A Level

Entry Requirements

Students must have studied Art at GCSE. Art work will have to be evaluated before your place is guaranteed. A higher grade at GCSE would be advisable.

Skills required

The ability to work with a broad range of media, and the ability to work independently to develop, refine and communicate their own ideas, their own intentions and their own personal outcomes.

Course outline

The A level specification in art and design encourages students to develop their intellectual, imaginative, creative and intuitive capabilities. Students will cultivate their passion and enthusiasm for art, craft and design. The course gives students the opportunity to understand the interrelationships between art, craft and design processes and an awareness of the contexts in which they operate. They will gain knowledge and experience of real world contexts; an understanding of art, craft, design and media technologies in contemporary and past societies and cultures – as well as an awareness of different roles, functions, audiences and consumers of art, craft and design.

Student testimony

“Art broadens your perspective & opens your mind to wider creative interpretations.” – Emily H

Career paths

This course also forms an excellent platform for students wishing to move into the creative arts industry. Many students progress on to study specialist courses at National Diploma or further education.

Course outline/assessment

This is a two year full A2 qualification. There is no AS examination.

 

All students will provide evidence of practical work in a number of different areas:
Drawing, Painting, Mixed Media, Sculpture, Print Making, Graphic Design,
Ceramics, ICT and Image Manipulation.
During the summer term students have the opportunity to work with an artist in residence.

Qualifications

Exam board: Edexcel
A Level

Entry Requirements

GCSE Grade 6 in Sciences

Skills required

Studying Biology develops the biological knowledge and skills to study a bioscience related degree.
You will also gain a wealth of transferable skills such as problem solving, data analysis and team work that are valued in many degree programmes.

Course outline

Biochemistry – How biological molecules are formed and the importance of their properties to living organisms.
Animal Physiology – How different organ systems in the body work.
Plant Physiology – How plants work and photosynthesis
Cell biology – Structure of cells how they replicate, cancers and respiration.
Genetics – Molecular techniques and how it works, the ethics and how different diseases are inherited.
Pathogens – How pathogens spread, reproduce and illnesses they cause
Environmental biology – How living organisms interact with the environment and the effect of humans on the environment.
Classification, evolution and conservation – How do we classify different species, how have they all evolved and what role do zoos play in conservation
Student testimony

Career paths

Biology is a key subject for lots of STEM careers, particularly in healthcare, medicine and jobs involving plants or animals.
The list is pretty long and includes:
nursing, dentistry, forensic science, psychology, physiotherapy, botany, environmental science, zoology, geology, oceanography, pharmaceuticals, energy, teaching, science writing, genetics, research, chemical engineering, chemistry, materials science, nursing and midwifery, occupational therapy, optometry, sports science, conservation and speech therapy.

Course outline/assessment

Paper 1: Advanced Biochemistry, Microbiology and Genetics: Externally Assessed 30%
Paper 2: Advanced Physiology, Evolution and Ecology: Externally Assessed 30%
Paper 3:General and Practical Principles in Biology; Externally Assessed 40%

Qualifications

Exam board: OCR Cambridge Technical

Entry Requirements

English and maths GCSE Grade 4 or above

Skills required

– Communication skills – speaking and listening
– Reading skills
– Writing skills
– ICT Sills
– Independent enquirer
– Creative thinker
– Reflective learner
– Self-manager
– Effective participator

Course outline

Businesses operate in an environment which is dynamic, competitive, uncertain and frequently hostile. They need to constantly adapt to changes in their internal and external environments in order to be successful. These changes may include anticipating the actions of competitors, reacting to economic or political changes or making use of new technologies. Whether you aspire to be a business professional, manager, charity worker or entrepreneur, understanding the business environment is key to ensuring that the business in which you work reaches its full potential. Throughout this course you will develop an understanding of how and why businesses operate in the way they do.
You will look at a range of different types of business and business structures, and explore how the ownership of a business and its objectives are interrelated.
You will learn about the importance of different functions within a business and how they work together. You will understand the legal, financial, ethical and resource constraints under which a business must operate and how these can affect business behaviour.
You will explore ways in which businesses respond to changes in their economic, social and technological environment, and the necessity for a business to plan.
You will appreciate the influence different stakeholders can have on a business, and you will learn how to assess business performance.

Student testimony

Career paths

Within this business course it is a great way to develop many of the transferable skills needed for working in a business environment. Careers can be perused in Sales and Marketing, Finance and Accounting Research and Development and Human Resources.

You will also build up the skills to start your own business and become an Entrepreneur.

Course outline/assessment

Unit NumberUnit TitleGLHAssessment
1The Business Environment120Exam
2Working in Business60Exam
4Customers and Communication60Assignment
5Marketing and Market Research60Assignment
8Introduction to Human Resources60Assignment

Qualifications

Exam board: Edexcel
A Level

Entry Requirements

GCSE Grade 6 in Sciences

Skills required

Chemistry helps you to develop research, problem solving and analytical skills. It helps to you challenge ideas and show how you worked things out through logic and step-by-step reasoning. Chemistry often requires teamwork and communication skills too, which is great for project management.

Course outline

The aims and objectives of the Pearson Edexcel Level 3 Advanced GCE in Chemistry are to enable students to develop:
• essential knowledge and understanding of different areas of the subject and how they relate to each other
• a deep appreciation of the skills, knowledge and understanding of scientific methods
• competence and confidence in a variety of practical, mathematical and problem-solving skills
• their interest in and enthusiasm for the subject, including developing an interest in further study and careers associated with the subject
• an understanding of how society makes decisions about scientific issues and how the sciences contribute to the success of the economy and society.

Student testimony

Career paths

Chemistry helps us to understand the world in which we live and underpins a wide range of science-based degree courses and careers. Success with A level chemistry will prepare you for a future in chemistry, pharmacy, pharmacology, chemical engineering, biochemistry, biomedical sciences, medicine and dentistry.

Course outline/assessment

Paper 1: Advanced Inorganic and Physical Chemistry 30%
Paper 2: Advanced Organic and Physical Chemistry 30%
Paper 3; General and Practical Principles in Chemistry 40%

Qualifications

Exam board: WJEC
Level 3 Applied Diploma in Criminology

Entry Requirements

GCSE Grade 4/5 in English.

Skills required

Budding cfriminologists will enjoy learning about different types of crime and will be able to assess the validity of criminal investigations and court decisions. They will have a critical mind and will enjoy pouring over case notes before they evaluate the effectiveness of methods used to identify crimes and apprehend criminals. They will be self-motivated as a large proportion of the course requires detailed course notes and independent work to prepare for the controlled assessments.

Course outline

Criminology is a 2 year course made up of 2 external examinations and 2 internal controlled assessments.
The course consists of considering crimes that are hidden and the impact this may have on the individual and society as a whole. Students will be expected to create a campaign to raise awareness of hidden crimes and will design materials to help with this. They will consider the role of the media in the presentation of crime and how this may impact the public perception of crime. They will also study reasons for crime which include biological, sociological and psychological explanations. Students will also spend time considering criminal investigations from the committing of the crime, through to the court case and sentencing. They will evaluate the effectiveness of all aspects of the investigation and the personnel involved such as the police, forensic scientists and the crown prosecution service.

Student testimony

Career paths

Criminology can lead to a variety of careers within the criminal justice system, such as the police, probation, lawyers and barristers and prison staff. It can also lead to a degree in criminology/criminal justice/sociology and psychology.

Course outline/assessment

Year 1
Unit 1: Controlled Assessment: The Changing Awareness of Crime (hidden crimes, consequences for the individual and society, the role of the media and the validity of crime statistics) This unit also includes the design of a campaign to raise awareness and effect change in relation to a hidden crime.

Unit 2: External Examination: Criminological Theories (biological, sociological, psychological theories and how they are effective in both explaining crime and informing changes in policy)
Year 2
Unit 3: Controlled Assessment: From Crime Scene to Courtroom (evaluation of the effectiveness of the different roles within a criminal investigation, the techniques used such as offender profiling and DNA, how forensic evidence is processed and stored, what happens at a trial and how valid are court decisions? Students will also look at miscarriages of justice)

Unit 4: External Examination: Crime and Punishment (the criminal justice system organisation, the aims of punishment and the effectiveness of prisons and other forms of punishment)

Qualifications

Exam board: AQA
Level 3 Advanced GCE in English Literature B
Entry Requirements
GCSE Grade 6 in English Language or Literature

Skills required

Students who enjoy this course are interested in people – how the act, how they feel, why they do what they do. They have questions about humanity, society, morality and creativity. They enjoy thinking critically, questioning assumptions and looking for alternative viewpoints. They love reading, books, films and stories of all kinds. They have a keen eye for detail and are interested in the ways that writers use their skills to convey messages and manipulate emotions.

Course outline

English Literature is a two-year A-level course with no external examinations at the end of year 12. A level English Literature studies how great writing enables the exploration of many of life’s fundamental themes: love, loneliness, prejudice, bravery and justice to name but a few.
The course covers a variety of modern and historical Prose, Poetry and Drama texts from Shakespeare and to Ian McEwan, with many more along the way. The content is designed to introduce students to a range of challenging and interesting texts so that students are able to discuss literature holistically within its context and through a range of critical approaches. In addition to ‘set texts’ which you have to study, you will be expected to explore your own interests: indeed a willingness to ‘read around’ texts is essential.

Student testimony

Jasmine Year 13 “It’s a challenge … an exciting and extremely rewarding one. Seeing your knowledge gradually come together … it doesn’t get better than that!”

Peter Year 13 “It requires a lot of work at home, however it’s really interesting and can be very rewarding.”

Zak Year 13 “There are many different books to learn about and debates to discuss in class.”

Megan Year 12 “A level is so different to GCSE. It’s my favourite subject. You learn about aspects of English Literature as a whole, like the history and different movements which really helps your understanding”

Molly Year 12 “Studying English Literature provides me with a range of challenges from reading and studying difficult texts to class debates. It’s a very interesting and rewarding A level.”

Career paths

English Literature is a highly respected A level and is facilitating subject for Russell Group Universities. As well as an English Literature degree itself, students of Literature might go on to study for degrees in a range of subjects including: History, Sociology, Psychology, Drama and Theatre Studies and Law. Even Medical Schools value the subject highly.

It is also very effective in developing transferrable skills such as communication, close analysis, and the ability to construct a well-argued case. These are highly valued in a range of graduate careers such as Teaching, Business and Finance, Journalism, Publishing, Law and Politics.

Course Outline/Assessment

Paper 1: Literary genres Aspects of tragedy
Study of three texts: one Shakespeare text; a second drama text and one further text, of which one must be written pre-1900
Assessed by written exam: 2 hours 30 minutes: closed book – 75 marks
40% of A-level
Section A: one passage-based question on set Shakespeare text (25 marks)
Section B: one essay question on set Shakespeare text (25 marks)
Section C: one essay question linking two texts (25 marks)
Paper 2: Texts and genres: Elements of crime writing
Study of three texts: one post-2000 prose text; one poetry and one further text, one of which must be written pre-1900. Examination will include an unseen passage.
Assessed by written exam: 3 hours: open book – 75 marks
40% of A-level
Section A: one compulsory question on an unseen passage (25 marks)
Section B: one essay question on set text (25 marks)
Section C: one essay question which connects two texts (25 marks)
Non-exam assessment: Theory and independence
Study of two texts: one poetry and one prose text, informed by study of the Critical Anthology
Two essays of 1250–1500 words, each responding to a different text and linking to a different aspect of the Critical anthology One essay can be re-creative. The re-creative piece will be accompanied by a commentary.
Assessed by teachers-50 marks. Moderated by exam board.
20% of A-level

French Exchange
Qualifications

Exam board:Pearson Edexcel
Advanced GCE in French
Entry Requirements
Grade 6 or above GCSE French

Skills required

Resilience

Independent research
Interest in the culture of France and the French speaking world

Course outline

The course will give students an appreciation of the language, literature, film and culture in the French speaking world. It comprises four themes: changes within French society, artistic and political culture in French speaking countries, immigration and the French multicultural society, the Occupation and Resistance during World War II. Those four themes are studied alongside two works: one film and one book. Students will also carry out an independent research project on a topic of their choice which they will present and discuss during their speaking exam.

Student testimony

Jack Y12: “I am really enjoying A level French. I chose this subject because I would like to study languages at University and having a language at A level can open so many doors in the future”.
Abi Y12 “ A level French is my favourite subject. It is always enjoyable and I am really interested in the topics. I chose this subject as I am planning to follow a career in the French language.”

Career paths

Linguists offer much more than a high competence in the language(s) they have studied. Their communication and problem solving skills as well as their adaptability and cultural agility make them highly valued by a wide range of employers. Aside the more obvious careers in interpreting, translating and teaching, language graduates also work in fields such as journalism, publishing, the diplomatic services, international trade or tourism to name but a few. French in particular is spoken in over 77 countries over the five continents.

Course outline / assessment

Paper 1Listening, reading and translation                            80 marks       40% of the qualification
Paper 2Written response to works and translation          120 marks       30% of the qualification
Paper 3Speaking                                                                         72 marks      30% of the qualification

 

Qualifications

Eduqas A-level

Entry Requirements

Students should attain a grade 5 in English Language or English Literature and successfully complete the pre-course tasks.

Skills required

Students must have a desire to deepen their understanding of film, a dedication to directed and independent study and an enthusiasm for creativity and discussion.

Far from being a passive activity of simply watching the screen, Film Studies can help you gain an appreciation of film as an art form. It can develop your knowledge of storytelling, practical creative applications and understanding the world in terms of competing attitudes and beliefs.

Film Studies at Coombe Dean School will provide an engaging, challenging and exciting opportunity to study the medium of Film through its processes, messages and connotations.

Course outline

Students will study a range of films from silent cinema, modern American film, British and World Cinema, documentaries and experimental film.

Students will ultimately demonstrate their knowledge with two examinations at the end of Year 13 with elements of practical and theoretical coursework.

Student testimony

Career paths

Employment in the screen industries has grown by over 20% since 2009. Career paths for students of Film may include practical ‘film-making’ avenues such as Directing, Producing and Editing, but also allows movement into Film Criticism, Journalism and Teaching, among others. Universities view Film Studies as an academic subject and is a relevant A Level for further study or entry to reading Humanities and arts related disciplines.

Course outline/assessment

Term 1 – An introduction to film: the basics and traditionsTerm 4 – British Cinema: Trainspotting and This Is England
Term 2 – Global Cinema: Pan’s Labyrinth and Beasts of the Southern WildTerm 5 – Film Movements: Silent Cinema
Term 3 – Hollywood: Vertigo and Blade RunnerTerm 6 – Film Movements: Documentary film

Why Study Film?

https://youtu.be/LzbdkF4rvX8

Qualifications

Exam board: AQA
Level 3 Advanced GCE in Further Mathematics
Entry Requirements
GCSE Grade 7 or above in Mathematics.

Skills required

This course is best suited to students who have a natural aptitude and a real love of mathematics. Students who get the most out of their Further Mathematical studies enjoy solving longer and more complex problems, can identify the knowledge required to answer a question and understand how to apply this knowledge.
These students are also highly organised and can plan and schedule when they are going to complete work. They are pro-active learners who will actively seek help if necessary.

Course outline

Further Mathematics builds on the concepts taught in A level Mathematics helping to increase students’ depth of understanding of the topics covered. As well as digging a little deeper into some familiar topics, students will also be introduced to new ideas, such as imaginary and complex numbers, matrices and infinite series.

In Year 12 some of the compulsory content for pure maths includes topics such as imaginary and complex numbers, roots of polynomials, curve sketching and inequalities, infinite series, conics and calculus. There is some flexibility in the applied topics studied, with the option to extend the work done on statistics or mechanics, or to study topics from discrete mathematics.
Student testimony
Thomas M (Y13)- I find further maths very interesting, as the teachers teach you more than just the simple ways to solve a problem. They show you that there is more than one way to look at a problem and everything can be solved but the answer may not always be clear to see! Because of this, teachers have shown me that life is so much more than can be seen, and this is why it is my favourite subject.
Hannah R (Y13) – Taking Further maths has strengthened my Oxford application greatly. The analytical thinking of mathematics helps us understand the complex world around us and makes the impossible possible!
Jack T (Y13)- Further Maths has given me the skills required to pursue a career in higher engineering.

Career paths

The Russell Group of leading UK Universities describes Further Mathematics as a ‘facilitating subject’. It lists the subject as one that ‘can give me the most options’.
The subject is useful for further studies or careers in Biochemistry, Physics, Aeronautical Engineering Actuarial Science, Chemical or Electrical Engineering, Mathematics, and any form of medicine.

Course outline/assessment

Exam 100%: Three papers taken at the end of the course.

Paper 1: Pure Maths

Paper 2: Pure Maths

Paper 3: Discrete and Mechanics

Ongoing assessment: Throughout the course students will have in class assessments- using exam practice questions to assess their understanding of the content covered. Students will be given opportunity to see marking criteria and compare it against their work, making dedicated improvements where needed.

Qualifications

Exam board: Edexcel A level

Entry Requirements
A minimum of a Grade 5 at GCSE.

Skills required

Students need to show evidence of being able to:
• Explain and analyse key geographical information.
• Research and keep up to date with relevant and topical global affairs
• Contribute to geographical debate and discussion
• Argue and evaluate geographical concepts
• Make informed decisions based on evidence
• Carry out primary and secondary data collection for geographical fieldwork, to then present and analyse for a Non examined Assessment

Course outline

Dynamic Landscapes:
•Tectonic Processes and Hazards
•Landscape Systems, Processes and Change – Coastal Landscapes and Change
Dynamic Places:
•Globalisation
•Regenerating/Diverse Places
Physical Systems and Sustainability:
•The Water Cycle and Water Insecurity
•The Carbon Cycle and Energy Security
Global Development and Connections:
•Superpowers
•Global Development and Connections – Migration, Identity and Sovereignty
Student testimony

Career paths

Geography continues to be the most employable degree, with the subject allowing students the flexibility to branch into a varied range of career paths, to include: Economic Developer, Location Analyst, Retailer, Regional Developer, Transport Manager, Weather Presenter, Disaster Manager, Flood Prevention Officer, Risk Assessor, Water Supply Coordinator, Estate Manager, Forestry Ranger, Environmental Consultant, Pollution Analyst, Conservation Officer, Planner, Social Worker, Market Researcher, Housing Officer, Estate Agent.

Course outline/assessment

Paper 1, and Paper 2Both 30% each
Paper 3: Synoptic themes20%
Non Examined Assessment20%

Qualifications

Exam board: AQA
Level 3 Advanced GCE in History
Entry Requirements
History at GCSE level to grade 6 or above and level 5 or above in English Language and/or Literature.

Skills required

To study History at Coombe Dean you will be required to have an interest in the past, an enquiring mind and a positive work ethic.

Course outline

We follow the AQA exam board at A Level. Students study the topics below throughout Year 12 and Year 13:

Paper 1- The Tudors, 1485-1603- 40% A level Exam: arguably the most famous dynasty in history, the Tudors were certainly a force to be reckoned with- at home and abroad! This option allows students to study in breadth issues of change, continuity, cause and consequence in this period through the following

key questions:

  • How effectively did the Tudors restore and develop the powers of the monarchy?
  • In what ways and how effectively was England governed during this period?
  • How did relations with foreign powers change and how was the succession secured?
  • How did English society and economy change and with what effects?
  • How far did intellectual and religious ideas change and develop and with what effects?
  • How important was the role of key individuals and groups and how were they affected by developments?

Paper 2: The American Dream: Reality and Illusion, 1945-1980- 40% A level Exam

This option provides for a study in depth of the challenges faced by the USA at home and abroad as it emerged from the Second World War as a Superpower. For many Americans, post-war prosperity realised the ‘American dream’ but the prosperity was not shared by all and significant problems at home and abroad challenged the extent to which the ‘American dream’ was a reality. It explores concepts and ideas such as American identity at home and abroad, anti-communism, social equality, ethnic identities and federal versus states’ rights. It also encourages students to reflect on the nature of democracy in a pluralistsociety, political protest and the power of the media.

Student testimony

‘I chose to study History at Coombe Dean because I love the subject and knew that I would be so well supported by my teachers. I have felt confident joining in Year 12 because our teachers embedded the skills for A Level early with us at GCSE. History is great because you get to learn such a wide range of knowledge that can be applied to current situations. We debate, work in groups and independently. I love that I really have the time to delve into the subject in such great detail. The topics are really interesting and the teachers are really enthusiastic, knowledgeable and supportive. It’s a facilitating subject, so the skills I am learning in it really compliment my other A Levels too’. Isabelle Edwards, Year 12.

Career paths

Studying history provides students with cultural awareness and an understanding of how to learn from the successes and mistakes of the past. History equips students with skills that are not confined to the study of the past. Skills of analysis are invaluable in many jobs; the ability to analyse and prioritise information is vital to decision making. There are a wealth of career opportunities available to history students, from media to business, research, law, education and government intelligence. Studying history endorses independence in young people and provides a skill set for students to be able to keep their career options open.

Course outline/assessment

All topics, aside from the coursework, are examined at the end of Year 13. Prior to this, students will complete assessments within their lessons alongside mock exams.

Paper 1- The Tudors, 1485-160340% A level Exam
Paper 2: The American Dream: Reality and Illusion, 1945-1980

 

40% A level Exam
Coursework– you decide20% of your A Level, assessed by your teachers

For further information, please watch: https://youtu.be/NnQnfs2YCNs

Qualifications

Exam board: BTEC
Entry Requirements
Students looking to take BTEC IT should have the following requirements: Maths level 5 and English level 4

Skills required

Ability to work to deadlines set
Follow instructions given in a brief
Plan in a logic way
Confident use of ICT/Computers

Course outline

This qualification is designed for learners who are interested in an introduction to the study of creating IT systems to manage and share information, alongside other fields of study, with a view to progressing to a wide range of higher education courses, not necessarily in IT.

The course consists of four units:
Unit 3: Using Social Media in Business
Coursework unit made up learning and assignment tasks to be completed.
Unit based around the use of ‘Social Media’ for business, including websites and content creation for posting on social media platforms (e.g. Facebook, Twitter, etc)

Unit 2: Creating Systems to Manage Information
This controlled assessment is completed over a 5 hour period with two separate parts (Part A / Part B), carried out over an arranged time by the exam board.
Unit is externally assessed through a task set and marked by Pearson.

Unit 1: Information Technology Systems
Written examination set and marked by Pearson.
Learning content through study/activities.

Unit 6: Website Development
Coursework unit made up learning and assignment tasks to be completed.
Based around learning about, designing, and creating a website for a given client

Student testimony

Career paths

In today’s workplace, those with knowledge and skills in computing and ICT have the opportunity to pursue new and exciting careers and to be instrumental in the conception of ICT that increasingly shapes work and leisure activities.

This course is perfect for students thinking of going on to Higher Education, IT/ICT based apprenticeships but also for those who are looking to enter the world of work.

Possible linked career paths include; Web site/Graphic design, Office ICT work, IT technicians trainee

Course outline/assessment

Unit 3: Using Social Media in Business
Coursework (90 GLH)
Unit 2: Creating Systems to Manage Information
Controlle Assessment (90 GLH)
Unit 1: Information Technology Systems

Written Exam (120 GLH)

Unit 6: Website Development

Coursework (60 GLH)

Qualifications

Exam board: AQA
Level 3 Advanced GCE in Mathematics

Entry Requirements

GCSE Grade 6 or above in Mathematics.

Skills required

Students who get the most out of their Mathematical studies have good problem solving skills and can use these to identify the knowledge required to answer a question and how to apply this knowledge. These students are also highly organised and can plan and schedule when they are going to complete work. They are pro-active learners who will actively seek help if necessary.

Course outline

Students will be taught an approach to Mathematics that will enhance their problem solving skills in this subject as well as help to equip them for A levels in a variety of other areas. All the content for A-level is compulsory and will focus on topics from pure maths, statistics and mechanics. Topics which will be new to most students include calculus, series, logarithms and coordinate geometry from pure maths; binomial probabilities and hypothesis testing in statistics; motion of a particle and the forces acting on it in mechanics. Also included in the new specification is an emphasis on proof as well as the use of technology to help solve problems.

Student testimony

George W (Y13)- Maths gives you advanced problem solving skills that are really valuable for further education.
Arseniy M (Y13)- Maths is a very interesting subject and is very useful for a future career in Engineering.
Brendan T (Y12) – Maths is a challenging but rewarding subject.
Xin L (Y12)- Maths makes me feel really proud when I am able to solve a problem that I didn’t know how to do before. I really enjoy it.

Career paths

Popular career choices for those with A Level include engineering, computing, accountancy, economics, banking, business, retail management, surveying, psychology, air traffic control, architecture, cartography, psychology and teaching.
Many students continue to university courses in physics, business studies, psychology, computing, engineering, many stipulate Mathematics as essential.

Course outline/assessment

Exam 100%: Three papers taken at the end of the course.
Paper 1: Pure Maths
Paper 2: 1/2 Pure maths and 1/2 Mechanics
Paper 3: 1/2 Pure maths and 1/2 Statistics
Ongoing assessment: Throughout the course students will have in class assessments- using exam practice questions to assess their understanding of the content covered. Students will be given opportunity to see marking criteria and compare it against their work, making Dedicated Improvements to their own piece.

Qualifications

Exam board: RSL

Entry Requirements

Evidence of high attainment at GCSE in the relevant areas and/or by audition on an individual basis.

Skills required

Independent practical skills
Teamwork
Creativity
Organisation
Reliability
Dedication
Strong musical performance skills

Course outline

The Diploma is a vocational course and as such is 100% coursework with no final exam. Units are designed to mirror ‘real world’ work such as studio recording, event planning and professional commissions. The selected units cover a wide variety of skills some of which will be new to all students and some which will build on their current talents.
We follow the Performance Pathway which means that a significant amount of the course is performance-based. There is no traditional theory module in this qualification but learners are tasked to research and evaluate a range of musical topics.

Student testimony

The level 3 diploma in music is a fantastic course for any aspiring musician. The course covers a range of skills including arrangement, lyric writing, performance and development of your own instrument. This course has been fantastic for my confidence as a musician both in my performance and my capabilities surrounding my instrument whilst also adding new skills to my repertoire. The course is the perfect combination of independent learning and classroom teaching with advice and guidance from Mr Kay who has been extremely supportive throughout the whole course and available at any point we needed. The chilled atmosphere to the lessons, and the diploma as a whole, makes it a much less stressful course to take whilst being extremely enjoyable, informative and inspiring. It also gave me a high quantity of UCAS points with the course being worth the equivalent of one and a half a-levels which was a great bonus. I highly recommend this course to ANYONE with a passion for music or who is looking to enter the music industry as a career.

Career paths

Music technician
Music educator
Performer
Arranger
Event planner
Session musician

Course outline/assessment

Unit 303 – Arranging MusicUnit 370 – Studio Sound Recording
Unit 310 – Composing LyricsUnit 385 – Improving Instrumental Performance
Unit 349 – Planning a Career In MusicUnit 387 – Rehearsing and Performing
Unit 362 – Lead Performer

Qualifications

Exam board: AQA
A Level

Entry Requirements

GCSE Grade 6 in Sciences

Skills required

Physics will help you to build up your problem solving, research, and analytical skills. With these skills you’ll be able to test out new ideas plus question and investigate other people’s theories, which is useful for any kind of job that involves research or debate.

Course outline

A level Physics gives you the opportunity to explore the phenomena of the universe and to look at theories that explain what is observed. This subject combines practical skills with theoretical ideas to develop descriptions of the physical universe.
Student testimony

Career paths

Physics is especially helpful for jobs that involve building things and developing new technologies, including: engineering (flight, buildings, space, you name it…), astronomy, robotics, renewable energies, computer science, communications, space exploration, science writing, sports and games technology, research and nanotechnology (that’s engineering on a seriously tiny molecular scale).

Course outline/assessment

AS: 2 papers. 70 marks each. 50% each.
A2: 3 papers. Paper 1 and 2 85 marks each. Paper 3 80 marks.

Qualifications

Exam board: AQA
Level 3 Advanced GCE in Psychology

Entry Requirements

GCSE Grades 5/6 in English, Maths and Science

Skills required

Students study psychology because they have a keen interest in the brain and human behaviour. They want to find out why humans do what they do and what influences our behaviour. They will be curious and critical and have a desire to apply their knowledge to the real-world. They will be empathetic and motivated to effect change in the lives of others.

Course outline

A-level Psychology is a 2 year linear course with 3 examinations at the end of year 2. A variety of topics are covered including introductory topics such as different perspectives, cognitive psychology and memory, developmental psychology and attachment, social psychology, psychopathology and mental illness (such as OCD, depression and schizophrenia), neuroscience, research methods the nature of relationships and forensic psychology.
Throughout the course, there is the continued discussion of the nature nurture debate and relevant influences on human behaviour.

Student testimony

Career paths

Psychology can be used in any career where people are involved. It can lead to a degree in psychology which is the first step in becoming a psychologist. It can also support studies in other areas such as teaching, law, criminology, zoology and various health professions.

Course outline/assessment

Paper 1
2 hour exam consisting of a variety of extended writing and short answer questions. These will include introductory topics in psychology (social, memory, attachment and psychopathology)
Paper 2
2 hour exam consisting of a variety of extended writing and short answer questions. These will include topics relating to the application of psychology in context (approaches, biopsychology and sleep, research methods)
Paper 3
2 hour exam consisting of a variety of extended writing and short answer questions. These will include topics relating to issues and options in psychology (issues and debates, schizophrenia, relationships and forensic psychology)

Qualifications

Exam board: AQA
Level 3 Advanced GCE in Sociology

Entry Requirements

GCSE Grade 5 in English Language

Skills required

Students who enjoy this course are interested in finding out how and why people behave in different ways in various parts of society. They have questions about why some groups of people have better outcomes from education and health care than others, and are interested in ways in which the government acts to help sections of society. They are intrigued by crime and deviance and wish to understand and explain types of crime and why some groups of people are more likely to be arrested and sent to Prison. They enjoy reading, watching documentaries and looking at the way in which the media is used to inform and persuade people.

Course outline

Sociology is a two year course with external examinations at the end of the two year period. The course looks at ways in which Sociologists investigate people in social groups and issues of social change in recent times. It is concerned with challenging issues facing society today including crime rates, homelessness, education, disabilities and illness and inequalities between different social classes, gender and ethnic groups. The content is designed to stimulate discussion and debate about society today and help students become critical in their thinking and socially aware.

Student testimony

Dylan, RAF Police – “a really relevant A level and helpful to my Police Studies Degree – I was thankful for learning how to research and explain social issues.”

Hannah, NHS Nurse “Provided a fascinating study of society and useful to me for my Nursing Career”

Caroline Year 13 “sociology is such an exciting subject and there are so many theories of society that challenge my thinking and are also actually visible in society”

Tia Year 13 “being able to dive into the depths of why people do and think certain things is interesting. It heightens your understanding of your ‘self’ and this heightens the commitment to the course”

Career paths

A strong and respected A level for a broad range of careers including Journalism, Nursing, Midwifery, Paramedic, Police, Social work, Law, Teaching, Youth work, Probation Officer and Local Government. Our students have progressed to a multitude of excellent University courses leading to professional and rewarding jobs.

Course outline/assessment

1 Paper 1 Education and Research Methods – Assessed by written examination – Two hours duration.

2 Paper 2 Optional Paper: Health Studies, Media Studies, Global development. Two hours duration.

3 Paper 3 Crime and Deviance, Theory and Methods. Two hours duration.

Qualifications

(Pearson) BTEC Level 3 National Extended Certificate in Sport

Entry Requirements

BTEC L2 or CNAT L2 Merit or above
GCSE PE level 5 or above

Skills required

An interest in sport and recreation is essential, with current club or county representation within a sport strongly advised.
Students who enjoy this course are sports enthusiasts, who often have an interest in a career within the sports sector. They are athletes with good practical and theoretical ability who can research, analyse and evaluate performance in order to improve it.

Course outline

The BTEC L3 allows students to further explore theory and pathways within the sports sector. Students will develop more in depth knowledge and understanding of anatomy and physiology, and will apply sports science concepts to case studies where a healthy, active lifestyle is not being met due to a person’s environmental factors. Students will also take on roles of instructors, leading clients through fitness testing processes. They will also further explore their own future employment options and pathways within the sports industry.
Student testimony

Career paths

With a broad range of topics covered throughout the course, students will be equipped to transfer their skills within a range of sports sectors. This may include employment within the leisure industry, the armed forces or advancement to University courses in sport science, development, coaching or teaching. Students may also advance within nutrition, health and social care or medical routes.
Due to the nature of units studied, the course also effectively develops leadership and communication skills, in conjunction with close analysis and evaluative skills. Students will be equipped with further knowledge of leading healthy, active lifestyles within any route they may choose.

Course outline/assessment

4 units of which 3 are mandatory and 2 are external. Mandatory content (83%). External assessment (67%).
Unit 1: Anatomy and Physiology
Learners explore how the skeletal, muscular, cardiovascular and respiratory systems function and the fundamentals of the energy systems.
Written examination, 1.5 hours. 80 marks
Unit 2: Fitness Training and Programming for Health, Sport and Well-being
Learners explore client screening and lifestyle assessment, fitness training methods and fitness programming to support improvements in a client’s health and well-being
Set and marked externally and completed under supervised conditions. In Part A, learners will be given a case study one week before a supervised assessment period in order to carry out preparation. In Part B, the supervised assessment period is 2.5 hours as timetabled by Pearson. Written submission. 60 marks.
Unit 3: Professional development in the Sports Industry
Learners explore the knowledge and skills required for different career pathways in the sports industry. Learners will take part in, and reflect on, a personal skills audit, career action plan and practical interview assessment activities.
Coursework submission & scenario interview assessment
Unit 5: Application of fitness testing
Learners gain an understanding of the requirements of fitness testing and learn how to safely conduct a range of fitness tests for different components of fitness.
Coursework submission & practical assessment

  • Health and Social Care
  • Digital Media
  • Travel and Tourism
  • Drama and Theatre Studies
  • Politics
  • Media Studies
  • Art, Craft and Design
  • Computer Science
  • Religious Studies, Philosophy and Ethics
  • Photography

Visit our consortium partners for their course details – links below:

https://www.heles.plymouth.sch.uk/page/?title=Course+Information&pid=58

https://plymstockschool.org.uk/sixth-form/